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By Emma Castleberry

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By Emma Castleberry

Death and funerals, while unpleasant for many of us to consider, are inevitable occurances that we need to prepare for, both emotionally and financially. As one gets older, the burden of care falls on younger, and often less financially stable, family members. This reality makes it all the more important that the elders within a family provide clear and practical next steps upon their death. No one wants their family’s grief and sadness to be compounded with financial stress.
There are a number of ways for individuals to set aside money for their funeral services. Here are some tips and strategies.

1. Be Realistic

Coming face-to-face with funeral costs can be jarring for some. The products, services and planning tha...

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By Emma Castleberry

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By Emma Castleberry

One of the most important parts of most funeral services is the eulogy. A eulogy is a speech that celebrates the life of the deceased. Some funerals will have more than one eulogy, and some funerals will have no eulogy at all. Often, the family members that are planning the funeral will request a eulogy from friend or close loved one. The religious officiant of the funeral can also deliver the eulogy.

What Should I Include in a Eulogy?

Your eulogy should definitely include the things you loved about the deceased. The speech meant to be personal but also relatable, so while you should include anecdotes unique to your experience with the deceased, you should also include other stories from friends and family members.

When possible, humor is always a good idea—funerals can be stressful and tense, and a little joke can go a long way to making guests feel more comfortable. But humor isn’t always accessible when you’re grieving a loved one, so don’t try to tell a funny story unless it comes to you naturally.

If you are uncomfortable taking an emotional approach to a eulogy, it is also acceptable to highlight a person’s accomplishments and milestones in life. Mention their marriage, children and career, or discuss hobbies and passions.

How Long Should a Eulogy Be?

Like any speech, a eulogy shouldn’t be too long—never more than 10 minutes. Short and sweet is a good rule of thumb, but it’s also important not to be hasty or casual when writing and delivering a eulogy. Eulogies generally last between three and five minutes.

The length of your eulogy will depend on how fast you speak. Generally, between 400 and 900 written words will make for an appropriately timed eulogy when delivered orally.

Tips for Delivering a Eulogy

Above all, you must practice delivering your eulogy. It’s not enough to simply write the speech—you need to say it out loud several times to become comfortable with how it sounds.

When speaking publicly, remember not to rush—this is a common mistake and it makes your speech hard to understand. You should speak slowly enough that it feels a little unnatural. Also, use pauses throughout your eulogy so you can take a breath or a drink of water, and people can have time to process your words.

Try to notice and eliminate ticks like tapping your fingers, playing with your hair, or wringing you hands. These little habits are often unconscious to you but they can be distracting to the audience.

Your Eulogy Will Be Perfect

If the funeral planner requested a eulogy from you, it means they have faith in your ability to honor their loved one and you will undoubtedly rise to the occasion. Even if your eulogy wasn’t specifically requested, speaking from the heart is guaranteed to convey your sympathy for the family and your appreciation of the deceased. Remember that a eulogy is part of the grieving process for you and everyone else, so don’t put too much pressure on yourself.

temp-post-image By Emma Castleberry

While there are certain standards of etiquette that apply to all funerals, the funeral process at a national cemetery is slightly different than a traditional cemetery. Knowing what to expect at a funeral or memorial service can make the process more comfortable for everyone involved. If you are going to a ceremony for a deceased veteran at a national cemetery, here is what to expect.

National Cemeteries Don’t Host Funerals

It’s important to be aware that national cemeteries don’t have the facilities to host traditional funeral services or open-casket viewing. Sometimes, families will choose to have a funeral prior to the ceremony at the national cemetery.The service that is held at a national cemetery...

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By Emma Castleberry

Did you know that you or your loved one can receive Military Funeral Honors even if the funeral is not at a Veteran National Cemetery? Not only is it possible to receive these honors for a service held in a private funeral home and cemetery, but their availability for eligible veterans is mandated by Public Law 106-65.

What are Military Funeral Honors?

The most basic services included in Military Funeral Honors are the folding and presenting of the flag (often to the widow/widower or next of kin) and the playing of taps. This process will be performed by a pair of Armed Forces members, one of whom will be from the deceased’s parent Service.

If the body is transported, the flag will often be placed over the casket. T...

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By Emma Castleberry

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By Emma Castleberry

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By Emma Castleberry

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By Emma Castleberry

A decision often associated with cremation is choosing an urn that will hold the ashes or cremains of your loved one. While some people choose to have their ashes scattered after cremation, others choose to remain with their family in an urn or have their ashes buried in an urn.

While the word “urn” has come to mean any container that contains the ashes of a cremated person, the typical shape for an urn is rounded with a tapered base and a stem neck. Contemporary urns can take a variety of different shapes, styles, colors and sizes.

Choosing an urn, like all decisions associated with death and the celebration of a life, can be overwhelming and sometimes complicated. Here is a guide to help with choosing and purchasing an urn for your loved one’s ashes.

Factors to Consider

There are three primary factors to consider when choosing an urn:

  1. Size
  2. Material
  3. Style

While your choice of material and style will be a matter of personal taste, the size of your urn will depend on a number of other factors.

How to Choose an Appropriately Sized Urn

Determining urn size requires knowledge of the cremated person’s weight upon death as well as knowledge of the urn categories available to you. A common rule of thumb is that you need a cubic inch of space within the urn for every pound of weight before cremation.

Urns usually come in four sizes: adult, keepsake, child and companion. An adult urn is sized to hold a person who weighed between 180 and 200 pounds upon their cremation. A keepsake urn is designed to hold just a small part of the person’s ashes, often used to spread the ashes among family members or different places. Child urns are larger than keepsake urns but smaller than adult urns—sized to fit a child’s cremains. Companion urns provide a vessel for two people who wished to be urned together, such as a married couple. These are larger and can usually hold the resulting ashes of a combined weight of 300 pounds before cremation.

Of course, when choosing urn size, it is better to be cautious and end up with a little too much space than not enough. Additionally, considering where you will put the urn might impact the size: ensure that the dimensions of the urn will fit in that space.

Choosing the Right Material For An Urn

Urns can be made of mostly any material, which can make this decision daunting. Ceramic or metal urns are more traditional, but urns are also available in glass, wood and stone.

When choosing the material for an urn, it’s important to consider where the urn will be placed after the funeral and/or memorial is over. If, for instance, the urn will be on a low shelf in a house with children and pets, it might be best to choose a durable material like aluminum or brass that can withstand bumps and falls. If you plan to bury the urn, there are a variety of biodegradeable urns available, as well. Cost will also be a factor when choosing the urn material.

Style and Design Choices for an Urn

The style of the urn can be deeply personalized. Custom-made urns, while expensive, allow loved ones to create any shape and design they wish. Artists can engrave messages on an urn, paint or tile an urn and even add photos, plaques and other memorabilia to the urn design.

All style choices will come at an additional cost.

Choose the Urn That’s Right For You

For those of us who will keep our loved one’s ashes, an urn is an investment. It is worth spending a little extra money now to ensure that your urn is durable, long-lasting and pays proper tribute to your loved one.

Contact Us

6051 East Seven Mile Road,
Detroit, MI
48234
(East of Mound Road)

contact@hutchisonfuneralhome.com

Direct Line: 313-893-1880
Fax: 313-891-1758

Hutchison Funeral Home

6051 East Seven Mile Road,

Detroit, MI 48234

Phone. 313-893-1880

Email. contact@hutchisonfuneralhome.com